Finished Workshop “The Gacaca courts that judged the crime of genocide in Rwanda: dialogue for reparations and building relationships between victims and perpetrators who live in the neighborhood” (Jan. 31)

2023.01.06

Category: Workshop

Research Group: A03 Migrants & RefugeesB03 Peace Building

The workshop “The Gacaca courts that judged the crime of genocide in Rwanda: the dialogue for reparations and building relationships between victims and perpetrators who live in the neighborhood” will be jointly organized by B03 “Trust and Peace Building in Conflict Affected Areas” and A03 “Migrants, Refugees, and Community Building.”

Date: Tuesday, January 31, 2023, at 10:00-12:00
Venue: Online via Zoom
Presentation: Natsuki Katayama (Osaka University)
Discussant: Yukie Osa (Rikkyo University)
*This workshop is only open to members of the “Islamic Trust Studies”

Program
10:00-10:05 Introduction by Masako Ishii
10:05-10:45 Natsuki Katayama “The Gacaca courts that judged the crime of genocide in Rwanda: the conversation relationship building between victims and offenders for solving the problem of reparation”
10:45-11:00 Comments and discussion by discussant
11:00-11:30 General Discussion
11:30-12:00 Internal Meeting

Abstract:
In Rwanda, a country in Africa, more than five hundred thousand Tutsi were killed during the genocide occurred in 1994. As many Hutu civilians incited by the government participated in the genocide, rural habitants who had coexisted and interacted in the neighborhood were divided into victims and perpetrators. The new government implemented provisional courts called “Gacaca” which judged civilians related to the genocide in municipalities throughout the country from 2001 to 2012. All habitants of eighteen years and over were obliged to participate in the operation of the courts, and the number of perpetrators tried in the Gacaca courts totally reached about one million. The Gacaca courts sentenced to imprisonment and community service such as road building and house building for murder and injurious assault and to reparation for larceny and property damage. In my oral survey, as most of the perpetrators whom I interviewed were tried for all crimes, they started paying reparations after their terms of imprisonment and community service. However, the field survey conducted from 2014 to 2016 showed many cases that they haven’t paid reparations in full yet. The reparations for the property plundered by the perpetrators are so heavy that many perpetrators cannot clear them off even with all their wealth. As a result, they are reduced to poverty because of the loss of farmland and livestock. At the same time, the victims, who had their property carried away, are also reduced to poverty because they cannot receive reparations. The government decided to require both sides to solve the issue of reparations between those concerned instead of taking over reparations, and therefore further delays of payment cause a serious chain of poverty. Though both victims and perpetrators are in such a predicament, they are making every effort to solve the issue of reparations through dialogue in daily interacting with one another in the neighborhood even after the genocide. This presentation will demonstrate the practice of building relationships between victims and perpetrators.

Contact: Saki Yamamoto (yamamoto_saki[at]rikkyo.ac.jp

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